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Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Fortress of Solitude



The adventures of the last few months have been great. Travel expands one's mind. My lovely wife and I have had a blast. However, our time in the south will be coming to an end soon.

In a couple weeks, if all goes well, we'll be back home in the woods. I've missed family and friends more than anything else. After that, what I miss is my fortress of solitude, my home office. It's wall to wall books -and quiet. Civilized places always have noise. Maybe you city folks don't notice it, but for me it's distracting.

We spent some quiet time on the sailboat, anchored in isolated coves away from civilization. There were some good places for thinking, but the boat was pretty cramped for writing. I'm too tall to sit up comfortably in the cabin. Some sort of table to put the laptop on would have been nice too. It's one of the things we'll be looking for in the next boat.

In the weeks and months ahead, I'll have the peace and quiet to reflect on this past winter. Solitude is good for that. Of course, one has to have something to reflect on. How much wisdom can a hermit on a mountain really have? Once in a while it's necessary to climb down and see what's going on in the world.

-Sixbears

14 comments:

  1. We often forget to listen to the quiet and sometimes the quiet can be awfully loud. I think many of us USA consumer get shaken by the quiet or the dark so we can't deal with ourselves if not constantly entertained or at least distracted.

    I set up my RV to be comfortable but Sat. dishes and bigscreens is not my idea of camping. You want to watch the big game stay home with all it's comforts.

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    1. I'm always amazed at how many people go to beautiful places, only to sit in their RV watching TV all day.

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  2. It's not just the noise, there is always a bunch of background lighting too.

    It's never truly dark around civilization.
    It's just something else you don't notice until you get away from it on a clear night and realize how many stars are in the sky that you can never see while around a city or town.

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  3. Imagine...lying at anchor on the mouth of the Amazon, knowing that there are many miles of blissful wilderness upstream just waiting for you to explore...
    In a microcosm, that's where you were when anchored at the mouth of the Little Shark river...It will forever more be calling to you, asking to come back and explore me....

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    1. I know, I know. I want to go back and do it right. My lovely wife does not see the attraction, so I'll have to it it by myself. She'll be perfectly happy to take the dog and go somewhere else for the duration.

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  4. That last sentence is oh so profound!!

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  5. Better be careful, or ragged pilgrims will soon knock on your door saying, "Tell me, oh wise one,..." (Sorry, I couldn't help myself.) Once again, I think you've hit the nail squarely on the head.

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    1. My lovely wife made me promise to never start a religion. :)

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  6. Who knows? Maybe some alone time would be good. Then again...maybe not!

    Bet you hate to leave the sun and the sand.

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    1. I will miss the warmth. NH is still in the grip of hard winter.

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    2. Then why go back, unless you're maybe getting low on funds...

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