Follow by Email

StatCounter

Monday, August 22, 2016

The long slow bug out to the woods



Do any of you harbor expectations of bugging out into the woods if things get bad? This is what it's starting to look like right now. In this NY Times article the homeless are invading the forests. Locals aren't very happy about it. There's been problems with trash, forest fires, and generally bad conduct.

This is what conditions are like when most people are still getting by. Imagine how messed up things would get in the forest if the situation went seriously south.

Imagine how things could be in the National Forests in the heavily populated Northeast? From Boston to the White Mountains is just an afternoon's drive. People living illegally in National Forests is nothing new to me. For years I've been running into long term campers in ramshackle trailers and RVs while gathering firewood with a dead and down permit. Sometimes they'd just move deeper into the woods once discovered. They pretty much all disappear when the snow comes. Winter here is brutal.

There is a lot of private forest land in my area. The locals would not take too kindly to squatters suddenly appearing on their property, cutting trees and piling up trash. Before long they would be moved out at gunpoint.

It is possible to live out in the woods. I've known a few over the years. One guy was a Vietnam Vet who never readjusted to life in civilization. His camps had low footprints, were deeper in the woods, and very hard to find. There was one young man who lived in primitive shelters who made a small income from trapping. Sadly, he died a few years after I met him from cancer.

Living as an individual or a small group can be done. Care must be taken to get far off the beaten path and to keep a low profile. Larger groups would most likely be discovered and considered a problem. Forget about being able to drive somewhere towing your 5th wheel and setting up house down a logging road. You might get away with it for a couple weeks, but after that authorities will take notice.

If you do plan on life in the woods, better have the woodcraft and knowledge to make it work. Be aware that it's a harsh existence.

-Sixbears

14 comments:

  1. This the major reason that we moved south from Idaho. Winter without the grid would be harsh and non sustainable.
    Whereas, in Florida , food and defense from the hoards are your primary concern.
    The hoards are terrified of the woods and swamps tho. Very few know how to survive here in the boonies. Yes, as you well know, much of the interior is vacant.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Learn to survive winter and you have the place to yourself. Of course, even the Natives went to the coast in the winter. There temperatures were a bit milder and sea food was plentiful.

      Delete
  2. That young man may have died before his time, but I'll bet he had many Life experiences he cherished while out in the woods.

    Living Life in my rurals (deep south Texas) would be quite the experience. Without steady shade, and a reliable water source, I don't see you lasting very long, especially during summer which is our stress period. Winters are pretty pleasant - the last snow fall was about 10 years ago, the previous about 40 or so. Snow is very rare down here, overnight freezes maybe once or twice a year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've been all over TX and conditions really vary. However, it's pretty darn hot in the summer all over the state.

      Delete
  3. Most folks who think they'll flee to the wilds wouldn't last there, anyway.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's going to be ugly. Most won't get much past the roads.

      Delete
  4. Living wild is more about everyday learning than anything else. Your mindset has to be right, as well!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mindset is absolutely huge. Living free is a full time job.

      Delete
  5. Euell Gibbons was my hero. Read his books and collected wild food every chance I had. Not so much anymore, but the knowledge is good to have in case it is needed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I tell people to learn 5 common wild plants and learn what to do with them.

      Delete
  6. bugging out to the wood seems like a good idea...untill some yahoo with too much likker starts a bon fire...where are you going to bug out to when the woods are on fire???

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a good idea until everyone tries to do it, including the idiots.

      Delete
  7. my plan is to urge everybody to escape to out there

    then will have first pickings of local leftovers

    Wildflower

    ReplyDelete