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Sunday, September 15, 2013

Time, distance and money



I've noticed that the way people refer to distance has changed. Ever ask how far some place was and get an answer in time?

“It's about an hour away.”

Of course they are assuming that if you take the direct route, drive the speed limit, and experience no other delays, it takes about an hour.

Maybe someone will say something is a 15 minute walk away.

It's pretty normal to tie time and distance together. After all, we have light years right? The distance light travels in a year.

Lately I've been hearing distance referred to in money terms. A guy came up from town to cut the grass at the family camp.

“It cost's me fifteen dollars to get here.”

People say things like, “It costs me eleven dollars to get back and forth to work each day.

There seems to be an acute awareness on exactly how much it costs to go places. The days of easy motoring are gone. When budgets are tight, it matters. If people are hyper aware of the cost of travel now, what will happen when gas and diesel take another big jump?

As for my own self, distance is in terms of jugs of veggie oil. How may jugs of veggie will it take to go to the coast and back? Then I fill the vehicle auxiliary tank and load jugs in the back of the van. Maybe I'll throw in one or two more for insurance.

One thing that has happened since people started thinking of distance in terms of dollars. I get a lot fewer visitors at my place in the woods. People are limiting trips to the bare essentials.

Time is money, but so is distance.

-Sixbears

12 comments:

  1. Good point. I try to get my wife to understand that it basically costs us $10 to leave the house.

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  2. True story, my Dad used to judge distance and even give directions by tavern location.
    He gave me directions one time on how to drive two thirds of the way through Oregon and into Washington state, at night, by bars. I was at the job site on time at six A.M. the next day.

    You know, the old, "drive until you see the Big Red Barn and then turn left" thing.

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    Replies
    1. Friends sister gives directions like that. Tavern to tavern. Last stop, her apartment next to a little hole in the wall bar. Neglected to mention the giant cathedral across the street.

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  3. I can't take my money with me when I die, so why not spend it on fuel and take the trips you want. It will only get worse if you wait. I don't want to be on my death bed and wishing I had seen places I wanted to and never got the chance.

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    Replies
    1. That a darn good use of one's money if travel = enjoyment.

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  4. sixbear its even a higher cost than most people think.a mile cost 50 cents or more.If its 200 miles a week to work and home it cost over 100$.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are just looking at gas, never mind wear and tear, insurances and so on.

      My wife had a high paying job 50 miles away. Good thing we had a veggie burning old Benz. Rarely broke down. We paid off a lot of bills when she worked there.

      A lot of jobs are not worth the cost of getting there.

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  5. Funny, but now that you mention it I've noticed the same. A guy, just the other day said, "You know, Stephen, I spend five dollars a trip, in gas, just to visit your shop."

    Sign of the times, isn't it...

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    Replies
    1. It sure is. Glad I'm not the only one who's noticed.

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  6. Yep, my folks' place is a $30 round trip. Don't get up there much these days...

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    Replies
    1. I think people used to travel more and worry about the cost less.

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