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Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Garden Knowledge



I was talking gardening with a friend of mine the other day. He's been gardening for a long time. On top of that, he's inherited a lot of family knowledge about growing things around these parts.

In the past his knowledge served him well. His gardens produced well. The last few years his gardens haven't done as well. He says the old ways don't quite work as well. From what he's seen, he's a firm believer in climate change. More of his growing is done indoors or under cold frames.

Right now, after some really nice weather, we actually stand a chance of snow the next two nights. Temperatures are predicted to be 27 degrees Fahrenheit. A few days after that, we could get back up into the 80s. I'm just glad we still have our starter plants inside.

At least the wild greens are doing well. I think I'll pick a mess of those for the pot tomorrow.

-Sixbears

14 comments:

  1. SixBears,

    I think our weather and the content of the soil has a lot to do with how our plants are doing. Last year, I also ran into bad seeds from a vender.

    Hopefully, your weather will balance out and finally get to Spring type weather to help with outdoor planting.

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    Replies
    1. We've been saving at least some of our seeds, so that helps.

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  2. I think I got some bad potting soil and have messed up a part of my garden with it. A lot of things can happen.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Unless a person has tried it, they don't know how much can go wrong.

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  3. It's cold here @ 28. Tomorrow should warm up to normal Spring temps. I also have starter seedlings in the house. If the weather holds we can plant the garden this weekend. Last year it was warm enough to plant in April. The cold weather hasn't bothered the dandelions though!

    Phyllis (N/W Jersey)

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    Replies
    1. I happen to like dandelions, so that's good. :)

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  4. Hard for a southern boy like me to think of snow in may! I guess thats the reason swiss chard,kale, turnup greens,radishs and rubarb were so popular early crops all are cold tolerant and mature fast.Anything fresh after a winter of stored food is,was a blessing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Doesn't help when we also get frost in the middle of August some years. Tough when corn and squash barely have time to produce.

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    2. treat squash like you would a pumpkin. Protect from frost with straw. You can keep them going till Oct easy.

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  5. At least if there is another ice age you have relatives and friends in Texas.

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  6. I was just reminded of this saying Sixbears.
    We are what we eat...

    ReplyDelete