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Saturday, November 8, 2014

The high cost of free



The battery bank for my solar electric system is showing its age. Probably by next spring I should give replacing the batteries some serious thought.

My new neighbor says he has 60, 2 volt heavy duty batteries. They were backup batteries from a hydroelectric plant. The guy offered them to me for free. They'd make a super battery bank. Those batteries are way out of my price range.

I'm going to refuse them. Sometimes the price of free is too high. No doubt he'd want some kind of favor in return. Already he's tried to buy some of my land from me. Also, he's discovered that he doesn't own the back driveway to his place. It's my road, the lower end of it anyway.

It would be hard to say no to a guy who did me a big favor with the batteries. I don't want to owe this guy anything. Don't get me wrong. I've been nothing if not polite. I even forgave him for trimming a couple of my trees before he learned where the boundary line was. So I'm going to be all smiles, make small talk, and firmly refuse every single offer the guy makes me.

Here's the thing. I don't like the way the guy treats land. He has no respect for the natural world. He's a bulldoze and pave it sort of guy.

-Sixbears

18 comments:

  1. I know a man who has the same sort of attitude. He can be sort of generous but there always would be a catch. I think it gives him a sense of superiority to give something and then keep reminding you. Got caught a couple of minor occasions and don't accept anything from him anymore.

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    1. Some things come with too many strings.

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  2. Better to avoid being "beholden" to anyone. I have been given things that were useful to me, that the other fellow didn't want, but only when I'd known the person for a long time and knew there were not strings attached.

    I had a solar power system here for several years after 1999. The battery bank consisted of 8 big deep cycle purpose built batteries which required much attention and fine tuning. They had a life span of three years and at the end of that I did not replace them.

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    Replies
    1. I get a good 10 - 12 years out of my batteries, so the cost per year isn't too bad. I'm using golf cart batteries as they are about as heavy as I care to lug down the basement.

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  3. Came home after a week in hospital to find a dim glow in the light left on by SWMBO on Tuesday night. Shuffled down to the RV basement to check the battery charger's connections. Two 105 amp 6V deep cycle golf cart batteries read 6.7 volts in series! They were new in December and I've nursed those puppies with weekly water checks, etc. I just wanted to cry...

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    Replies
    1. Wow, that's terrible. Hope you get it sorted. Sounds like there might be a charging problem or a phantom load.

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  4. iot is to be a great defense to stave off a future offense

    good move six bears

    Wildflower

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Wildflower. Seemed like the thing to do.

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  5. I can get new T-105s for $124 locally with a core. Internet prices are high. Shop around.

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    1. I had good luck with Interstates and can get them delivered locally without paying shipping.

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  6. Replies
    1. I've got a lot of gut to trust . . .

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  7. I think you made the right choice by avoiding the "free" that might have strings attached later!

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    Replies
    1. A gift with strings is no gift at all.

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  8. Yes, a shame but there's no such thing as a free lunch...

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    Replies
    1. How about breakfast? I'm all for a free breakfast.

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  9. This past year of "free" airline stand-by travel has so far cost me about $1300. Won't fall for that one again, even though I know the giver wants nothing in return. I still have to pay him tax on what I did use, though...

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