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Saturday, May 23, 2015

When I'm done with a car



It's done. We got rid of our 2002 Chevy Cavalier. The brakes: lines, rotors, and pads were gone. Also there was possibly a leak in the master cylinder. The CV joints were making clunking sounds. The exhaust system was held up with wire coat hangers. The body was kept together with a disturbingly large amount of spray expansion foam and fiberglass.

Surprisingly, the engine started. In fact, after sitting inside a giant snowbank for 4 months, it turned right over. The engine ran rough and big clouds of white smoke blew out the exhaust, but it ran. The smoke might have been something as simple as the gas going bad over the winter, or it could have been as serious as a blown head gasket.

What does one do with such a fine fine car? Trade it in? That would have raised the price the of the deal. Sell it to a 16 year old kid? How could I have slept at night? This car once collided with a moose.

We did the only wise thing and called the local junk yard. (I mean auto salvage.) They were willing to haul it away for free. The fact that they also wrote a check for $100 was a true bonus. We didn't lose a car, we gained another parking space.

This car died well. All the major problems happened pretty much at the same time. The worse is when a car keeps having $300 - $500 dollar repairs over a number of months. You tell yourself that each repair would be last, but it never is. The thing to do with such a money pit is to drive it behind the barn and put a bullet through the engine.

So now we have a nice new car. I expect to drive it until the wheels fall off, or we come to the end of the petroleum age. Whichever comes first.

-Sixbears

13 comments:

  1. A new car!
    Wow! How exciting.
    I've seen new cars of course and I've known people who've purchased them but I've never had one!

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    Replies
    1. It's been decades. More for my lovely wife than me.

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  2. I'm not placing any bets on which comes ends first, your new car or the petroleum age.... if you kept the last one for 13 years, it's too close to call.

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  3. a sad day in the life of a trusty old rusty.....but a fine day for journey into the unknown......

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    Replies
    1. One has to make room in life so good things can come in.

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  4. I really hated parting with my 1984 Capri.

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    Replies
    1. I've had some good vehicles in the past, but I don't really get that attached anymore. When they get too expensive to keep on the road it's time to let go.

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  5. Replies
    1. No, it made it a lot easier to move. Too bad as the battery was one of the few good parts left.

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  6. I once had a Jeep Wagoneer that I drove for 16 years. Then it was worn out. So I put a "Jasper" rebuilt engine and transmission in it for $3,600.00. What I had not taken into account was that everything else in the vehicle was worn out as well. Bad head work on my part.

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    Replies
    1. Sometimes you just have to let something go.

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  7. The fact that its essential parts aren't working anymore means that it was the end of the road for your old car. That cylinder leak, in particular, is a wake-up call. It even seems that you have averted a disaster there. That, and the recurring cost of having to repair it every few months. Good thing you were able to buy a new one after that. I hope it lasts you for decades to come.

    Victoria Robbins @ Diviniti Auto

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