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Sunday, June 7, 2015

Orlov's engine



Recently Dimitry Orlov posted a plea for donations so he can replace the engine on his sailboat. Long story short: Last fall, not far out of Boston his sailboat's engine failed. He said it was too late in the season to deal with it. When he inspected in the spring he discovered salt water had mixed with the oil. The repairs cost more than it would be worth.

First of all I'd like to make it clear that I like Orlov. His Club Orlov blog site is one of my regular stops. Many of his ideas resonate with my own, certainly not all, but many. In spite of my general admiration for the man, his engine problems sent up a few red flags for me.

He didn't try to find out what the problem with the engine was right away. Instead, it sat all winter, getting worse by the day. Now stuff happens. I don't know his personal life. Sometimes we should tackle an unpleasant job but put it off. What I don't buy is the “too late in the season” bit. Too late to work on it comfortably I understand, but discomfort doesn't mean impossible. He's smart, an engineer, so he could have found a way.

So now he's pretty much stuck in Boston. That would freak me out if I'd written books about collapse. He's also promoted the Seasteading idea where people survive by heading out to sea in boats. Engine problems should not have sidelined him so badly. The whole idea of living on a sailboat is that it's possible to cast off your lines and leave civilization's problems behind you. Pretty hard to do if you can't even motor out of the harbor.

There are low cost alternatives to replacing his diesel engine. One quick and dirty solution is to slap a cheap outboard on the back. It's not elegant, but it will get you out of the harbor. It is a sailboat, after all. Plenty of people travel the world in sailboats without engines.

Of course, maybe the United States is in no immediate danger of collapsing. That would allow plenty of time to spend on engine trouble. Only god is perfect so maybe we should cut him some slack and send a few pennies his way.

-Sixbears




13 comments:

  1. Thriving in adversity is not tested enough in our society. A better request would have been for ideas. Like how to row a large boat out to a sailing area. Or how to rug an outboard motor or electric outboard.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thriving in adversity is not tested enough in our society. A better request would have been for ideas. Like how to row a large boat out to a sailing area. Or how to rug an outboard motor or electric outboard.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Asking for ideas would have been a better way to go. Fixing the problem by throwing money at it is the old way and not sustainable.

      Delete
  3. It sounds as if Orlov is pretty much a novice. And not very rich in common sense. This will certainly be a learning experience for him. Alas, no pennies for him.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Personally, I find it hard to give money to a guy who could easily make it.

      I don't want to go back to work so I try to find ways around problems without spending a lot of money. While I've got ads on my blog, there is no "donate" button.

      Delete
  4. I sent a little money -- go fund deal -- to a fellow that claimed he was losing his home. Wasn't long after that he announces on Facebook that he has purchased a new pistol.

    -Moe

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know the feeling. There are people I want to slap on the side of the head. Self restraint is hard sometimes.

      Delete
  5. Maybe he should get a part time job, earn his own money for his own repairs and quit living off other people. Of course I may be way off base because I know nothing of this guy other than what you have just posted.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. One could argue that they are entertained by his writing so giving him a few bucks so he can keep writing is fine. Those who make that argument can send him money.

      However, I think he should buckle down and solve his own engine problem. In fact, if he could find a low cost creative solution he could blog about that as that would interest me more.

      Delete
  6. This appears to me to be like a panhandler, mooching off others to fulfill his needs. I don't have a 30' boat, actually don't think I want one either. Something trailerable would be nice, like you have. Maybe I should start a blog and ask the readers for one.

    The point is nobody has ever given me stuff and certainly not a luxury. Why couldn't he ask the government, they'd probably give him an engine. It all comes out of our pocket anyway in taxes.

    My 3 cents, it went up due to inflation. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Okay everyone, let's fund Wade's boat! Kidding, just kidding.

      I was given a used pickup truck once. Times were tough. I didn't ask for anything but a friend saw I was in dire need of transportation and gave me his old one. I've been paying it forward.

      Still, I'm not sending anything to Dimitri as I don't see any dire need.

      Delete
  7. Way too many folks out there that are asking for money to keep doing something. Youtube is full of them.

    I do good keeping myself afloat, ya know?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Donations from folks on the Internet is rarely a good business model.

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