Follow by Email

StatCounter

Monday, April 28, 2014

After a month back home



My lovely wife and I have been back home for about a month now. After 6 months away there's a lot to catch up on. Bad weather hasn't helped the process.

Keeping the vehicles running is a big job in itself. We had both running well for less than a day. Then the diesel line on van plugged. After I got that fixed my wife's car developed a loud exhaust. Maybe several months sitting in a frozen block of ice didn't do the car much good?

There are more house projects, but only one or two are very pressing. Barring any major calamities, the end is in sight. Much to my surprise our calendar has few obligations this next week, so there's a chance to finish up. The house is pretty comfortable as it is.

I'm finally getting some time to reflect on the whole semi-nomadic lifestyle. We love both the travel and the stay at home parts. There are elements of both that we don't want to give up. The freedom of being on the road or in a boat is only really understood by doing it for a few months. It takes a while to fully adapt. Travel is about change and seeing new things. Travel is also about the inner journey that happens when someone is taken out of a settled routine.

As much as we love the gypsy life, we aren't ready to do it full time. We really enjoy our family and friends here in New England. Our house is a fun place. One of my granddaughters, when she was six, described it as “a wonderland where anything is possible.” That's kinda cool.

Home is where the massive library is. Electronic books just aren't the same. Home is where the tools are and the experiments happen. Living in a semi-remote area, we have the joy of solitude and quiet. That's something hard to find these days.

We could sell the house and buy a good sized boat to live on but we aren't ready for that. My lovely wife and I really like having a house to come back to. For the next few years we plan on doing the semi-nomadic thing. To make that work we've been simplifying the house, reducing living expenses -focusing on what's really needed and wanted. Our nomadic travels will also be kept simple. If we buy a bigger boat, it won't be much bigger. Small boats have small problems and small expenses.

Our lifestyle requires two different skill sets. The one thing that makes them both work is keeping everything as uncomplicated as possible. After a month back home, that's more clear than ever.

-Sixbears

10 comments:

  1. I don't think I'd want to live on a boat full-time anyway. Tsunamis are easier escaped on wheels.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Actually, tsunamis are easy to escape on a boat, just go to deeper water. Their effects are only near shore in the shallows.

      Delete
  2. It's simple really, just enjoy the best of both worlds...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's the plan and what I'm focused on.

      Delete
  3. Ah, but you two are lucky - you have a choice. (but there is nothing like coming home!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No telling what the future will bring,but for now we take advantage of our choice. It was less expensive to go sailing all winter than to heat the house. Go figure.

      Delete
  4. put your house on a barge and push it with several pushing diesel outboards running on veggie oil

    hey at least explore all your options

    Wildflower

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not a bad idea . . . for a start. Really. That's how my thinking processes start out. They get refined down what's doable latter on, but nothing is off the table to begin with.

      Delete
  5. What you are doing now gives you the best of two worlds, actually the best of three worlds. (Home, on the road, and on the water)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep, three worlds. Why not settle for only the best?

      Delete