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Friday, September 25, 2015

Boat selection



Life has settled down to a certain routine here in Florida to be with dad who was in the hospital. He's home now and comfortable. Things have settled down into a bit of a routine.

That's given me some time catch up on some long term writing projects. However, I must admit to checking out the local boat listings.

I've a list of things I look for in a boat. It's got to shallow draft, have simple repairable systems, be seaworthy, and it has to be a bargain.

Cruising catamarans have been completely out of the picture. While many are shallow draft, they tend to be complicated boats that sell for way too much money. Monohulls are a much better bargain.

Usually.

While searching the listings I've come across a Wharram designed sailboat. http://wharram.com/site/ If I was going to build a catamaran, it would be a Wharram. They are simple rugged boats that can be built for a reasonable amount of money. They've got a long history of amazing ocean passages.

Most “Yachties” don't like them. They are too primitive looking and lack the latest comforts. Of course, that makes them cheap to maintain and repair. Wharram even lashed things together instead of using expensive marine hardware.

The EMP collapse novel, “The Pulse” by Scott B. Williams, features a Wharram catamaran. It's a good choice for a bug out boat.

It just goes to show there are exceptions to everything.

I'm not really in a position to buy a boat quite yet, but my boat kitty is building up nicely. It's nice to know there are some interesting options out there.

-Sixbears

12 comments:

  1. Glad your dads home. On the boat its summers end prices will be falling. You going to be there for 6 to 7 months till april or may .Take a splurge on a good deal enjoy it for the winter. Sell it in the spring if you lose a 1000$ it cost 150 a month to use. You may even break even or make a profit. Every one knows you will tinker with it . Ask your wife I bet she would be onboard use/flip investment. Besides its killing you not having one isn't it.

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    1. We are playing it by ear right now. I really don't have too much time for a boat as we are taking care of dad. That doesn't stop me from looking. If I found the right boat I might consider finding a place to store it down here.

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  2. I met with James Wharram many years ago here in New Zealand. A number of my friends had his wonderful philosophical ocean travelers and enjoyed them immensely... One friend built a forty footer on banks of the Mahurangi River in the north of the North Island... he had two 90 watt solar panels, a couple of large batteries and a healthy inverter, He'd use his large power tools in the middle of the day when the sun was at it's most powerful... when he was finished he put the panels, the batteries and the inverter on board and sailed off into the sunset... The Wharram cats are a philosophy as well as a beautiful design, based on the KISS principle, they are a wonderful experience...

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    1. I get that was an interesting meeting. His boats appeal to my budget and my philosophy. There are a quite a few of them in Florida as they are ideal for the shallow waters.

      I saw some really nice professionally built ones down to Marco Island a couple years ago.

      Your friend had the right idea. I'd happily sail the world in a 40 foot Wharram -as a smaller Wharram could easily do the job too.

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  3. Sixbears: would you mind giving me your thoughts on this boat? http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listing/pl_boat_detail.jsp?&units=Feet&id=2858408&lang=en&slim=broker&&hosturl=torresen&&ywo=torresen&

    It has sold now, but I saw another one (perhaps with no motor) on Craigslist for less money. I think the sort of sailing you do is along the lines of what I am interested in.

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    1. Looks like a nice little boat. The price seemed a tad high only because the mainsail is original and pretty old.

      If you find one without a motor consider an electric. A boat this side should be able to move at 3+ knots with a 55lb thrust trolling motor.

      I'd sail the heck out of a boat like this.

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  4. I hope you get your boat you want, and chronicle your sailing adventures. I enjoyed a blog a fellow wrote from his boat, until he ran aground trying to get into a Caribbean harbor, damaged his boat and had to sell it to get the money to fly home. He was using a google earth picture instead of a chart and got into some coral shallows.

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    1. I'll keep on blogging. I'm going to be on some sort of boat.

      One guy I followed had the bad grace to get a massive heart attack and die. It's stuff like that inspires me to get out there sooner rather than later.

      I'm a big fan of shallow draft boats for Florida and the Caribbean.

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  5. Hoping your time with your dad is blessed. He is glad you and your wife are there for him. I can only hope my children are there for me.

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    1. Dad and I were always close. I'm glad to be in a position where I could come down and help. Wish I could do more for him.

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  6. I hope that all goes well with you and your dad. Being a caregiver can lead to a lot of closeness, that's for sure. I am hoping he continues to do well.

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    1. Time will tell. He seems stable now. I'm doing my best to make him more comfortable.

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