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Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Bunker mentality



I think bunker mentality is a more personal and local form of siege mentality. The tendency is to stick close to home where you are safe from the perils of the outside world.

Preppers are susceptible to the condition. We know there are dangers out there and have made preparations. We have basic food, water and defense covered. Our homes are our castles. The problem with castles is the barbarians at the gate. It's tempting to stay within our walls.

When we travel, we have our bug out vehicles, bug out bags and get home bags. You don't have to be in the cammo crowd to be prepared. Even city workers may keep good walking shoes, bottled water, some energy bars and a flashlight in their desk. It makes all the difference in the world if there is a power outage and walking home is the only option.

Problems arise when there's the opportunity to travel far from friends and family. Do we stay home where we are “safe,” or do we have an adventure? The thing about adventures is that uncomfortable and dangerous things really could happen. Of course, without that possibility, it wouldn't be an adventure now would it?

I must admit to having a bit of bunker mentality my own self. I get over it, as I love to travel. If a CME takes down the whole power grid while I'm in Miami, so be it. No sense in being a prisoner in my own home. Sometimes you have to trust in your skills, luck, and the kindness of strangers. Fortunately, I believe the universe rewards boldness more often than not. Besides, no one's getting out of this world alive anyway.

-Sixbears

8 comments:

  1. Amen. Especially on those last two sentences!

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  2. I have to admit to falling into a bunker mentality a couple of years ago. I really thought fall 2011 there would be a crash. I'm not much of a prophet as you can tell now!

    After being so wrong and working myself into a dither for no good reason I moved towards being self-reliant rather than just a prepper and I feel so at peace and much more confident that I can handle most anything that is thrown at me.

    This fall money is a little tight getting the wood stove installed and trying to build up the solar generator. But overall I feel ready and in 2014 I have some big plans to get out and see some more of the great state of Idaho and neighboring states. While there is nothing wrong with going long distance and seeing the sites. There are many great attractions here in Idaho I have never visited.
    My big road trip is visiting the Appalachian Mountains and the Smokey's. Your passion is for water, mine is for mountains and rugged canyon lands.

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    1. It's easy to get the bunker mentality. The key is living a way that works for you if nothing goes wrong. I grew up hiking the northern part of the Appalachians. Still love them, but also fell in love with the ocean.

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  3. I think that being mobile, even on a local scale is important, a fortified position is not a good thing. A lot of preppers have the Alamo mentality and even name their place after the Alamo. The Alamo didn't work out so good. I just don't have any money to go anywhere so I don't go unless I have to.

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    Replies
    1. . . . another reason to remember the Alamo. It didn't work out.

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  4. If the power grid fails, I would rather be in the RV as long as the fuel and fresh water tanks are full and the black and grey water tanks are empty. An added bonus is for the refrigerator to be full of goodies. If an emergancy hit, I could be going down the road in our "bug out" vehicle very quickly, althoug, we would probably be better off staying on my property.

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    Replies
    1. Your RV is bigger and better equipped than many homes. There are certainly less comfortable arrangements.

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