Follow by Email

StatCounter

Thursday, April 21, 2016

Of store cards and table saws



It's almost amusing. So I go onto the website of a well known building supply store. My store card was lost so I'm trying to replace it. The first thing that they want on the web site is the card number. What was I supposed to do, memorize it? Heck, I can't remember the passwords half the time.

After poking around the website for a while I found a phone number. Eventually I was able to contact someone who was able to ship me a new card. I wasn't going to bother with renewing the card, but the discount on materials will come in handy.

Last September I was repairing my deck. Had I been able to do the repairs before winter it would have lasted a few more years. Unfortunately we were needed in Florida right away so the project came to a complete halt. 6 months exposure to the weather did enough damage that a simple repair job won't be enough. The whole deck needs replacing.

Such is life.

My little table saw would have been fine for a repair job but is really too small for a job the size of a complete replacement. Did you ever buy something cheap for a job with the idea you'll replace it when it breaks? About 25 years ago I bought a little Black and Decker table saw with an 8” blade. The thing is mostly plastic. The little table saw still works.

Normally I'd be happy to have a tool that doesn't die. Year after year it keeps on running but it's just barely big enough to rip a 2X4. The safety switch will kick out a time or two before the cut is finished. That's how the thing keeps running. As soon as the motor is strained the least little bit, a safety switch kicks out. Everything has to cool down before the saw can restart. For years I've been stuck with a tool that mostly works, if one has the patience of Job.

When the new store card comes in and I buy lumber, a new table saw just might get thrown onto the pile.

-Sixbears

10 comments:

  1. Not being morbid but isn't it funny when we are young and need a good tool that's durable we cant afford it. Then when we are much older and can afford a good durable tool we don't have the years left to justify the cost. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I guess I'll just have to live forever. Got too much invested in life. :)

      Delete
  2. Rule of thumb, never buy a cheap tool.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Usually cheap tools die. This one is like an undead zombie that still shuffles along.

      Delete
  3. Actually, the saw would probably be fine for some guy who builds bird houses and such as a hobby.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've made it work, but enough is enough.

      Delete
  4. I still wander down the tool aisles. (And wish!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm still replacing tools lost when the boat when down. That's a good reason to wander the tool aisles.

      Delete
    2. I love wonder the tool aisles! The sales help would always walk up to Hubby and ask if they could help him. He would point to me and say you need to talk to her. They usually had a confused look on their faces.

      Delete
    3. One of my daughters said: I brought the power tools into the relationship.

      Delete