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Friday, November 4, 2016

Something with a handle



One of my cousins joked that you should never buy anything with a handle. That always means work.

Guess I didn't listen as I just bought another snow shovel. There's nothing wrong with my old shovel. When I saw one that looked good I had to buy it. You certainly don't want to be caught without one when it snows four feet overnight. (I continue to question my decision to remain here most of the winter)

Even better than having backup tools is being able to issue them to friends and family with strong backs. Nothing makes a job go better than a few more willing hands. If someone's willing to pitch in, I'm going to make sure I have enough tools to go around.

When the kids were still living at home we had a massive ice storm. School was closed. The grid was down. The kids needed something to do. I issued them all handsaws. They gathered and cut up big piles of dead branches the storm took down. They cut enough wood to keep the kitchen woodstove going. I believe I tended the coffee pot.

Right now I'm in the market for a lot of handles. All my backup axes, mauls, and sledge hammers need new handles. The quality of replacement handles has gone way down, but the price sure hasn't. Making them from scratch is an option, but time consuming. Maybe I'll just have to bite the bullet and buy some. Next time the local lumber supply has a new shipment I'll dig through the pile and hopefully find some that aren't half bad.

I'm at the point where a lot of my tools have no backup ready to go, and that's a bad thing. At least I'm set on snow shovels.

-Sixbears

10 comments:

  1. Handles cost . Good handles cost lots. Boiled linseed oil will make them last longer. Not missing when splitting wood saves axe handles. I think I need 3 I missed a lot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. At the price of good handles I can't afford to miss too much.

      Delete
  2. it has been now several years of making my own handels because even the pricy ones wear out fast

    good seasoned wood is required like oak or ash, even hickory


    Wildflower

    Wildflower

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Back when my dad and I were in the snowshoe business we had a lot of good ash available to us. Of course, we didn't make our own too often as good handles were still reasonably priced.

      Delete
  3. For my personal axe, I just decided to go synthetic and bought a Sears single bit 3 1/2 pound with 36" handle. I've had it for over 25 years now and its still going strong. My brother has a similar 5 lb wood splitter and it too is still going strong.

    My back ups have wood handles and I keep them hydrated with occasional wiping with Olde English furniture oil. Yes, not missing saves your axe handles.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Today's Sears is not the company of years ago. After some bad experiences with China junk I've sworn off the company.

      Delete
  4. Can't imagine having to shovel snow, much less needing a backup ...
    Living in Japan, we saw plenty of snow, but the neighbor in the house at the lower end of the drive kept it shoveled. Of course, he was also the caretaker, so I guess he kinda had to.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you have to spend hours shoveling, a good shovel is well worth the price.

      Delete
  5. I'm in the same fix. Looks like I'll be trying to do a little re-hafting this winter.

    ReplyDelete